Contact: Andrea Golden,

TILTS Third Symposium: The Digital and the Human(ities)

In this symposium, scholars will be encouraged to consider digital humanities from a critical standpoint as it impacts both the disciplines within the humanities and the people who practice them. Is the ongoing shift toward the digital leading to a loss of quality in textual interaction? As more and more interaction takes place on screen and remotely, as opposed to face-to-face and/or on paper, what can still be nurtured and what is being lost? How are notions fundamental to, and controversial in, the humanities, such as the visual, the oral, the subjective, the affective, the sexual, the geographic, the historical, human rights, justice, and the relation between the corporate and the public evolving in an environment characterized by digital mediation?

All events are free and open to the public. For access to UT's wireless network, visitors in the audience should speak to Lars Hinrichs or Matt Cohen.

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Keynote address: 5:30 p.m.

Mezes 1.306
Welcome: Matt Cohen and Lars Hinrichs
Introduction: Michael Winship
Keynote lecture: Johanna Drucker, "Humanist Computing at the End of the Individual Voice"
Reception: Mezes Lobby

Friday, May 27, 2011

All panels will be held in MEZ 0.306

9:30 - 10:00 a.m., coffee and snacks available

10:00 - 11:30 a.m., Session 1: Justice, Rights, and the Digital

Chair: Charlotte Nunes
Speakers: T-Kay Sangwand, "Collective Memories: Digital Archival Collaborations and the UT Libraries Human Rights Documentation Initiative"
James Pennebaker, "We Know What You Are Thinking: Enjoying the Brave New World of Language Analysis"
David Beaver, "Sins of Admission: Virtues and Vices of Automated Analysis of University Admissions Essays"
Anna Everett, "Obama, Social Media and the Viral Civil Rights Movement"

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., lunch

1:00 - 2:30 p.m., Session 2: Argument: Does the Nature of An Argument Change When It Relies on Digital Computing?

Chair: Stephanie Rosen
Speakers: Robert Mitchell, "Voice, Community, Network: Reflections on Digital Humanities from the Perspective of Science Studies"
Sebastian Domsch, "Critical Sharks in the Meme Pool: The Paradoxes of Criticism in Digital Media"
John Unsworth, "Datta-Mine-ing"
Comment: Samuel Baker

2:30 - 3:00 p.m., coffee break

3:00 - 4:30 p.m., Session 3: Automation and the Digital Vernacular

Chair: Robert K. Nelson
Speakers: Patricia Yaeger, "Luminous Trash: Throwaway Robots in Blade Runner, The Terminators, A. I. and WALL·E"
Lauren Squires, "Automatic Genres: Views of Language from the Digital Armchair"
Jason Baldridge, "Computational Grounding of Texts in Real World Proxies"
Comment: Coleman Hutchison

Saturday, May 28, 2011

MEZ 0.306

9:30 - 10:00 a.m., coffee and snacks available

10:00 - 11:30 a.m., Session 4: The Structure of Being on the Internet

Chair: Douglas Bigham
Speakers: Chris Ortiz y Prentice, "Writing Mass Effect Online: Reading User-Generated Content"
Joseph Thompson, "Magical Machines and Affective Actants: What Can Vital Materialism Mean for Video Game theory?"
Josh Iorio, "Shifting Patterns of Silence: Encouraging Participation in Virtual Workspaces"
José Enrique Navarro, “Liquid Authorship”

11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., lunch

1:00 - 2:30 p.m., Session 5: The Situations of Digital Humanities

Chair: Andrew J. Torget
Speakers: Matthew Kirschenbaum, "Digital Humanities as/is a Tactical Term"
Kim Christen, "Digital Humanities' Centers and Margins: Creating a Dialog"
Nick Montfort, "The Digital Rear-View Mirror"
Comment: N. Katherine Hayles

2:30 - 3:00 p.m., coffee break

3:00 - 4:30 p.m., Session 6: Visualizing: The Future of Academic Discourse

Chair: Kari Kraus
Speakers: Jeffrey Schnapp, "extraMUROS (archives across walls)"
Craig Campbell, "Revealing Pictures and Reflexive Frames"
Justin Hodgson, "Opening Ourselves to the Paradigm"
Comment: Johanna Drucker